Lie Vs. Lay When to Choose Which one and Why

Lie Vs. Lay When to Choose Which one and Why

Lie Vs. Lay When to Choose Which one and Why

Today we are looking to be the prevalent English grammar mistakes through the term lie vs. Lay. Many people may be in confusion which word they should use. Well, it is tricky for many writers, teachers, students, and even English native speakers. However, these words are interchangeable, but their meanings and spelling are pretty different. Therefore, it is challenging to select the right word in a sentence. No need to worry, here you will learn the following.

  • What is the difference between Lie and Lay?
  • When to choose to lie?
  • When to choose Lay?

Lie vs. Lay

What is the difference between the Lay and the laid? These are verbs; however, these words are frequently confused or misunderstanding even by native speakers of English. While Lay means to put something down [on something]- I lay the marker in my hand when you put down the pen. It is a transitive verb. Here is an excellent example of Lay present participle: I lay my head on the pillow. Laid past tense: yesterday I laid my head on the pillow, or yesterday I laid the marker on the pillow.

What is the difference between Lay and Lie?

Infinitive Present tense Past tense Past participle Past participle
To lay/lays lay laid laid laying

 

Lie Vs. Lay When to Choose Which one and Why

Meaning:  to put or place something down.

Transitive: it needs a direct object: we lay something.

They are going to lay new carpet throughout the house.

Past tense: we laid our picnic blanket on the ground.

Present participle: He is laying bricks for the new barbecue in his backyard.

While the word Lay is also used with birds: means to produce an egg. For instance, the hen laid an egg. Here egg is produced by the hen. In contrast, Lay also means putting something on the table, i.e., putting knives, plates, pens, etc., on the table.

On the other hand, the Lie is the conjugation of the verb lie to be on a surface in a horizontal position, usually resting. It is also an intransitive verb means it does not have a direct object after it. For example, he likes to lie in his hammock when it is a nice day. Lie also means not tell the truth. He tells a lie.

When to choose Lay?

Lay is a transitive verb in any sentence that means to put down gently or carefully. The hen lays an egg. Here an egg is a direct object.

  • You lay something down.
  • I lay my pen on the table.
  • The hen lays an egg.
  • Here egg is and direct object.

When to choose to lie?

The term Lie means to say things that are not true. It is a transitive verb. Here are some examples for more learning.

  • Why did you lie to me? I saw what you did,
  • She lied about eating the cake.
  • If you lie, your nose will grow.
  • He is telling a lie.
  • The lawyer tells a lie.
  • I don’t believe him because he has so lied many times.

Lie Vs. Lay When to Choose Which one and Why

Conclusion 

 Lay is a verb that means to put down gently or carefully. While lie is a verb which means to be in or assume a horizontal resting position. Hopefully, you find this lesson understandable; for more English learning, you can check out our other 501 words article at this link.

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